Micro-Credentials Round-Tables

The Australian Council of Profession’s inaugural series of Community of Practice Round-Table meetings continue the discussions and discourse that began at the Micro-Credentials National Summit in March 2019.


The intent of these Round-Tables is:

  • to investigate how Professional Associations can develop relevant standards and accreditation practices that best support the implementation of micro-credentialing within CPD/CPE offerings, both in formal and non-formal award settings.
  • to explore the ways in which Professional Association CPD/CPE offerings can be linked to Professional Practice credentialing to address:
    Life-long career learning
    – Engagement in the Professional Association community
    – Drive membership opportunities

Current definitions of the various micro-credentialing models are both confusing and varied. The way learning and training is recognized, accredited and validated is also changing with intrinsic on-the-job skills and best practices providing the most value and benefit to association members.

How can Professional Associations assist in developing a common language to best underpin this new educational landscape? How can we clearly define the differences between badging for learning and credentialing skills capability capture?

Professional Associations face a common challenge — how to remain relevant and expand their footprint in their particular domain. Success depends on the ability to create value for their brand. This free Round-Table is your opportunity to work with your peers within the Australian Council of Professions to determine how best to provide accreditation oversight of how Professional Practice credentials can help Associations address these common challenges.

Who should attend:
– Leaders of Professional Associations
– Directors of Professional Standards
– Heads of CPD/CPE Programmes

Topics discussed at the Round-Tables:

  • The common language that needs to be adopted to better understand the various models of micro-credentialing.
  • The types of Standards that need to be developed around Micro-Credentialing
  • The Accreditation Practices that should underpin Micro-Credentialing

The Round-Tables were held:
Sydney: 30 May 2019, Australian Computer Society
Melbourne: 25th June 2019, Deakin University


The generous support of the Australian Computer Society and DeakinCo is gratefully acknowledged!

Accreditation Systems Review (ASR)

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) in 2016 commissioned an Independent Review of Accreditation Systems (ASR) to explore and address concerns about cost, transparency, duplication and prescriptive approaches to accreditation functions.

The final report was considered by the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (AHMAC) and publicly released in October 2018. We were invited to comment and submitted extensive comments from our Members in February 2019.

PA and UA sign Joint Statement on Accreditation

Professions Australia and Universities Australia, the national peak body of the 39 public universities, have signed the Joint Statement of Principles for Professional Accreditation, a landmark agreement that will deliver greater clarity on the respective roles of universities and professional accreditation bodies to ensure graduates are best qualified for the professions they seek to enter.

The formal signing took place at Universities Australia’s flagship annual conference, which brought together more than 800 senior leaders from the university sector, business, policy and politics. Our President Michael Catchpole (front left) and Chair of Universities Australia, Professor Barney Glover, signed the Joint Statement which streamlines and improves consistency in the professional accreditation of university courses – essential to ensuring that graduates from professional degrees are ready for entry into the workforce. The agreement clearly defines the role of professional accreditation and the respective responsibilities of universities and professional accreditation bodies.

Universities Australia Chief Executive Belinda Robinson said that the agreement between the two peak bodies would benefit both students and professionals. “Enhancing national consistency in accreditation standards and processes at the discipline level will help to improve graduate mobility between States,” she said. “Professional employers around the country will be able to be even more confident that all graduates meet their standards.

Professions Australia (aka Australian Council of Professions – ACoP) Chief Executive Officer Liz Lang said that Joint Statement will further improve the competencies and job-readiness of graduates for entry into professional practice. “Universities and professional accreditation bodies will contribute to graduate quality according to their strengths. For the professional accreditation bodies, it is a focus on the capabilities, knowledge, ethics and professional standards needed for entry to the profession – while universities will focus on providing the best, cutting-edge educational design and course delivery. The statement is also an excellent example of how universities and the professions can work together to successfully self-regulate” Ms Lang said.

The members of Professions Australia and Universities Australia place a high priority on pursuing initiatives to enhance quality within the professions and to increase the contribution the professions make to the broader community.  While recognising that the overall professional accreditation process is a wider public good, Universities Australia and Professions Australia acknowledge that the immediate beneficiaries of robust professional accreditation processes are students and professionals.

Download the Joint Statement of Principles for Professional Accreditation here.

Read the joint Universities Australia and Professions Australia Press Release.

For more information on the Joint Statement and how you can use it in your organisation, please contact us on 1300 664 587 or CEO@Professions.org.au!

Accreditation Dialogue between Unis and Professions

Professions Australia hosted a member forum on 1 April 2015 to progress work on the Universities Australia and Professions Australia draft Joint Statement of Principles for Professional Accreditation.

Chaired by former Professions Australia Board Member, Mr Rupert Grayston, the forum saw constructive and robust dialogue between the universities’ and professions’ representatives.

However, the open and frank nature of the discussions were seen as a good basis for progressing the content of the Joint Statement.


For details of the Joint Statement, please contact us on 1300 664 587 or CEO@Professions.org.au.

Blueprint for National Registration of the Professions

The Blueprint for National Registration of the Professions has been developed by Professions Australia and its member organisations.  Our objective is to promote and facilitate the implementation of national registration arrangements for those professions currently subject to state andterritory based regulation.
The Blueprint acknowledges that Australia is a single integrated market, exposed to domestic and international competition.  National registration arrangements for individual professions are a logical step to promote competition and enhance the mobility of the professional workforce.